[EVENTS]

 

Abraham Kritzman and Eyal Sasson in conversation
Friday 5 May 2017  2.30pm


Abraham Kritzman  Cfig1 and 2  2017  oil on canvas  105 x 75 cm each

Please join us for a conversation with Artists Abraham Kritzman and Eyal Sasson on the occasion of their duo exhibition Stand Still.

 

David Cotterrell in conversation with Ruwanthie de Chickera
Tuesday 4 April 2017  6.30 - 8pm


David Cotterrell  Mirror III: Horizon  2016  collaboration with Ruwanthie de Chickera  HD video  photograph by Oskar Proctor

On the occasion of the last day of our exhibition Empathy and risk: three mirrors and a wall, please join us for a conversation with Artist David Cotterrell and Playwright Ruwanthie de Chickera.

 

The Art of Digestion: Stephen and Michael Farthing in conversation with Elpida Hadzi-Vasileva
Wednesday 25 January 2017  6.30 - 8pm


Elpida Hadzi-Vasileva Bibles I-V  2016  caul fat, perspex box  photograph by Nick Dunmur

Please join us for a conversation with Artists Elpida Hadzi-Vasileva and Stephen Farthing with Professor Michael Farthing.

Michael Farthing trained as a doctor in London, Cambridge and Boston and spent the first part of his career as a clinical academic with a major interest in the challenges of global health, particularly as they relate to the gut. More recently he has headed medical schools in Glasgow and London and has just stepped down as Vice Chancellor of the University of Sussex. He is a keen supporter of the arts and has particular interests in the visual arts, theatre and contemporary literature.

Stephen Farthing is the Rootstein Hopkins Chair of Drawing at University of the Arts London, a Royal Academician where he is Honorary Curator of the Collections and an Emeritus Fellow of St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford. He studied at Central Saint Martins (then St Martins School of Fine Art) and the Royal College of Art. From 1990 to 2000 he was the Ruskin Master of Drawing at the University of Oxford; from 2000 to 2004 he was director of the New York Academy of Art. Farthing has exhibited extensively, since his first solo exhibition at the Royal College of Art Gallery in 1977. His work represented Britain at the Sao Paulo Biennale in 1989, leading to many further solo shows around the world. Farthing was Artist in Residence at the Hayward Gallery in 1989 and is currently writing Living Color for Yale University Press with David Kastan and researching Leonardo: The Corpus with his brother Professor Michael Farthing MD. His most recent solo exhibitions include Drawn Words, The Pimsole Gallery, Hobart, Tasmania (2016); Titian’s Ghosts, National Trust, Ham House, London (2014). The Back Story was staged in November 2010 at the Royal Academy of Arts. Recent publications include: Derek Jarman, the sketchbooks, Thames & Hudson (2013); The Sketchbooks of Jocelyn Herbert, RA Publishing (2011); Art : the whole story, Thames & Hudson (2010).

The event is organised with Core charity, supporting medical research in digestive diseases.

 

Conversation with Timon Screech and Simon Wright
Sunday 10 July 2016  4pm


O JUN  14 days 119 years later – the 14th day  2016  Caran d’Ache crayons on paper  60 x 50 cm  and  Toyohara Chikanobu  Jidai Kagami or  Mirror of the Ages  1897  series of woodblock prints 
photograph by Oskar Proctor

On the occasion of the last day of our exhibition 14 days 119 years later, join us for a conversation with Professor Timon Screech from SOAS (School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London), specialist in the art and culture of early modern Japan, and Simon Wright, curator and Senior Cultural officer at the Japanese Embassy, followed by tea & cake.

 

14 days 119 years later  video screening curated by Mizuki Takahashi
Friday 1 July 2016  6.30pm


Lieko Shiga  Canary  2007  video

Artists’ video screening curated by Mizuki Takahashi including works by Futoshi Miyagi, Hanako Murakami, Akira Miyanaga, Lieko Shiga and Yuichiro Tamura.

Programme:
Lieko Shiga, Canary, 2007, 10'07 minutes
Yuichiro Tamura, NIGHTLESS, 2011, 11’32 minutes
Futoshi Miyagi, The Ocean View Resort, 2013, 19'25 minutes
Hanako Murakami, La Parfaite, 2015, 11’11 minutes
Akira Miyagana, arc, 2011, 7’29 minutes

The first camera was brought to Japan by Ueno Toshinojo, a merchant in Nagasaki in 1848; it was a daguerreotype. Hanako Murakami states in her video that Indians used to believe that being photographed would rob them of their soul. This belief was shared by Japanese in the 19th Century who were also afraid of this new technology. It was however too difficult to resist the curiosity of discovering the world through the lens.

For this screening programme, I have selected five artists who create lens-based work to construct time, landscape and narrative each with their unique approach.

Lieko Shiga usually works as a photographer. Her video Canary derives from her staged photo series of the same title. The video follows the rhythm and movement of her body as she shoots.

Yuichiro Tamura creates a short road movie with images taken from Google Street View. He has also shuffled and edited the initial edition to produce several versions of Nightless with different landscapes but the same narrative.

Futoshi Miyagi was born in Okinawa which was regarded as a holiday resort. However, it is a region that has been historically oppressed and scarified by governmental policy from Japanese mainland. Okinawa is also known as the island where a fierce battle took place during World War II. With this historical background, Miyagi’s video, The Ocean View Resort, poetically tells the provisional communion between an Okinawan boy and an American soldier.

Hanako Murakami uses photography as medium and subject for her conceptual works. Her video, The Perfect, starts with the story of the birth of the daguerreotype. She connects life and death behind the scientific invention and radioactivity with the accident at the Fukushima Daichi nuclear plant in 2011.

Akira Miyanaga’s video consists of footages shot in different locations. He installs his video camera onto the roof of his car and travels all around Japan. arc is a collage of footages shot in the North part of Japan after the disaster of 11 March 2011.

Travelling from past to present, transforming the invisible to tangible, using both microscopic and macroscopic lens, the video works by these five artists will show non-linear time and abstracted spaces which cannot be captured by our physical lens, our own eyes.

Mizuki Takahashi is a senior curator at the MILL6 Foundation in Hong Kong which will open in 2018. Prior to her current position, Takahashi worked as senior curator at the Art Tower Mito and was a founding member of the Mori Art Museum in Tokyo. Addressing subjects including cultural diffusion between West and Asia, gender, cultural politics and urgent social issues, Takahashi realised exhibitions covering manga, architecture, performance, film, sound, fashion and visual art. Selected exhibitions include: You Reach Out - Right Now - for Something: Questioning the Concept of Fashion, Art Tower Mito (2014); Darren Almond Second Thoughts, Art Tower Mito (2013); Tadasu Takamine’s Cool Japan, Art Tower Mito (2012); Quiet Attentions: Departure from Women (2011), Art Tower Mito and 8 Days: Beuys in Japan, Art Tower Mito (2009).

Booking is essential, please rsvp to danielle@daniellearnaud.com.

 

 

Envelope Opening for Closing Event  performance by Patrick Coyle
Sunday 22 May 2016  4.30pm


Patrick Coyle  Envelope Opening for Closing Event  2016

As part of Footnotes to a Long Distance Telephone Call, Patrick Coyle has been posting a series of items to Danielle Arnaud which are displayed in the exhibition. Envelope Opening for Closing Event will deliver the promise of its title on the final day of the exhibition, when Coyle will deliver a performance in which he opens these items and uses them as a script.

For their exhibition Karin Kihlberg & Reuben Henry have invited the Disembodied Voice research group to show new works and host a series of events. The group includes Maia Conran, Patrick Coyle, Karen Di Franco, Kihlberg & Henry, and was formed in 2014 as a format to explore manifestations of the disembodied voice within their own work and in wider culture. The disembodied voice, and its often inevitable re-embodiment in objects other than the original speaking body, are variously reflected in the exhibition and its associated events, from the recorded voice in moving image to its traces in written correspondences and archives.

Patrick Coyle (b. 1983, Hull, UK) is an artist and writer working predominantly with performance and sculpture. His practice considers the difference between sense and nonsense in verbal communication. Often borrowing from the conventions of guided tours and poetry readings, Coyle examines both the supposed authority of the lone orator and the psychological affect of reading aloud on both the listener and the speaker. Coyle completed MFA Art Writing at Goldsmiths, University of London (2010) and BA Fine Art at Byam Shaw, University of the Arts London (2005). He recently delivered performances at El Tercer Lugar, Buenos Aires; Catalyst Arts, Belfast; Van Alen Institute, New York; Global Committee, New York; Tate Modern, London; Institute of Contemporary Arts, London; Nottingham Contemporary; Wellcome Collection, London; ANDOR Gallery, London; Whitechapel Gallery, London, and Spike Island, Bristol (all 2014-16).
Recent exhibitions include: The Place Where He Is Meant To Be Lost, The Third Policeman, New York; Trim Your Tongue, DKUK Salon, Peckham, London; fig-2 28/50 Patrick Coyle & Francesco Pedraglio, Institute of Contemporary Arts, London; A Circular, Cubitt Gallery, London; It said, ANDOR Gallery, London.
Coyle is currently a resident at The Hub, Wellcome Collection, London, and a member of The Disembodied Voice research group.

 

 

John Smith screening and conversation with Kihlberg & Henry
Friday 29 April 2016  6.30pm


John Smith  Lost Sound  1998-2001  SD video, 28 mins, colour, sound

John Smith will be screening a series of films followed by a conversation with Kihlberg & Henry about the use of voiceover in his work. John Smith was born in London in 1952 and studied film at the Royal College of Art. Inspired in his formative years by conceptual art and structural film, but also fascinated by the immersive power of narrative and the spoken word, he has developed an extensive body of work that subverts the perceived boundaries between documentary and fiction, representation and abstraction. Often rooted in everyday life, Smith’s meticulously crafted films rework and transform reality, playfully exploring and exposing the language of cinema.

Part of the exhibition Footnotes to a Long Distance Telephone Call running at the gallery until Sunday 22 May 2016.

For their exhibition Karin Kihlberg & Reuben Henry have invited the Disembodied Voice research group to show new works and host a series of events. The group includes Maia Conran, Patrick Coyle, Karen Di Franco, Kihlberg & Henry, and was formed in 2014 as a format to explore manifestations of the disembodied voice within their own work and in wider culture. The disembodied voice, and its often inevitable re-embodiment in objects other than the original speaking body, are variously reflected in the exhibition and its associated events, from the recorded voice in moving image to its traces in written correspondences and archives.

Booking is essential, please rsvp to danielle@daniellearnaud.com.

 

 

I Decide Not To Operate Without Direct Communication  presentation by Karen Di Franco
Sunday 24 April 2016  4pm


Close up of redacted text, Lee Lozano to Barbara Reise, November 1971

Karen Di Franco will present I Decide Not to Operate Without Direct Communication. A postcard from Lee Lozano located in the archive of writer and critic Barbara Reise is taken as a starting point to discuss the temporalities of the archive. The philosopher Karen Barad has described the archive as trace rather than repository - as an assemblage of interactive phenomena. By articulating documents, the presentation will explore such interactivities.

Karen Di Franco works as an archivist, a curator, and is currently PhD candidate with Tate Britain and Reading University researching forms, strategies and contexts within artists’ publishing. Recent projects include the exhibitions The sun went in, the fire went out: landscapes in film, performance and text, CHELSEA space (2016), Icons of a Process, Flat Time House (2014) and the development of Book Works online archive and publication Again, A Time Machine (2010-12).
With Ami Clarke she co-organises the New Materialism reading group at Banner Repeater, London and is a member of the Disembodied Voice research group.

Part of the exhibition Footnotes to a Long Distance Telephone Call running at the gallery until Sunday 22 May 2016.

For their exhibition Karin Kihlberg & Reuben Henry have invited the Disembodied Voice research group to show new works and host a series of events. The group includes Maia Conran, Patrick Coyle, Karen Di Franco, Kihlberg & Henry, and was formed in 2014 as a format to explore manifestations of the disembodied voice within their own work and in wider culture. The disembodied voice, and its often inevitable re-embodiment in objects other than the original speaking body, are variously reflected in the exhibition and its associated events, from the recorded voice in moving image to its traces in written correspondences and archives.

 

 

ANATHEMA  artists' video screening curated by A- - -Z (Anne Duffau)
Sunday 10 April 2016  4pm

Danielle Arnaud invites A- - -Z for a finissage event in consonance with the exhibition Ichor running at the gallery.
A- - -Z presents a screening of four artist videos by Laure Prouvost, Zina Saro-Wiwa, Tai Shani and Jordan Wolfson.

Anathema - distortion / displacement / the other
An exploration in a contemporary gothic, a morphic human and a virtual voice - on the edge of the epicene; altering, adjusting, shifting, transforming, diluting…

Programme:
Zina Saro-Wiwa, Phyllis, 2010, 15'37 minutes
Laure Prouvost, We Know We Are Just Pixels, 2014, 4'44 minutes
Jordan Wolfson, Animation, masks, 2012, 12'29 minutes
Tai Shani, The Vampyre, 2016, 33'19 minutes

A- - -Z is an exploratory curatorial platform produced by Anne Duffau. Taking the formula of the alphabet, A- - -Z uses words related to the idea of Entropy as a starting point to map out and test various unstable potentials. One Letter, one experiment, twenty six times.

Booking is essential, please rsvp to danielle@daniellearnaud.com.

 

 

Death and Dying  video screening curated by David Lillington
Friday 11 September 2015  7pm


Artavazd Peleshian  End  1994  video  8'15 minutes

Fabienne Audéoud, Kate Davis and David Moore, Philip Hoffman, Sanna Linell, Ophélie Malassigné, Petrina Ng, Owen Oppenheimer, Artavazd Peleshian, Audrey Reynolds, Bartosz Sikorski, Malin Ståhl, Christina Stuhlberger.

Despite the humour, the fiction and the fictionalising, realism is the underlying tone of this selection of short films and videos on death, which also represent a number of related genres and approaches. What lightness or fantasy there is, is a measure of the artists' respect for their theme. All the work is both highly engaging and highly engaged, and deals with the idea of death but also with the particular case.

Programme:
Bartosz Sikorski, 1 bit pixel, 2009, 40 seconds
Malin Ståhl, We Didn't Say No, 2008, 10'20 minutes
Petrina Ng, Objectivity 3, 2007, 1 minute
Owen Oppenheimer, Nowhere Really (redux), 2010, 15 minutes
Artavazd Peleshian, End, 1994, 8'15 minutes
Ophélie Malassigné, The Letter, 2011, 1 minute
Sanna Linell, Innocent When You Dream, 2012, 3'10 minutes
Kate Davis and David Moore, The Cut, 2010, 2'45 minutes
Fabienne Audéoud, She Prepared the Staging of her Death, 2000, 7'30 minutes
Philip Hoffman, Somewhere Between Jalostotitlan and Encarnacion, 1984, 6 minutes
Christina Stuhlberger, 25 Years Later, 2009, 1 minute
Audrey Reynolds, Lenoir, 2014, 1'15 minutes

 

 

BEFORE DEATH, THERE ARE STRANGE SOUNDS, FROM SUNDAY FLOWERS
sound pieces programme curated by Gerry Smith

Sunday 12 July 2015  4-6pm


Gerry Smith  A year of painting flowers  installation view by Oskar Proctor

Please join us to celebrate the last day of Gerry Smith's exhibition A year of painting flowers with sound pieces by Sandra Cross, Julian Doyle and William English.

SANDRA CROSS - The MMs Bar
The MMs Bar recordings are part of an on-going project: ʻWhat Did You Eat Today?ʼ an enquiry into how we make choices about what to eat, how we navigate our way through the maelstrom of modern life via a blizzard of often conflicting information. Different lines of enquiry are explored. These include filmed portraits, audio taped interviews, sound poems, ephemeral visual and textual responses to the culture of food production and consumption. The subsections of the enquiry include: ʻThe Physiology of Tasteʼ Anagnostʼ & Take It Awayʼ, Mass Observation, Films, MMs Bar. In various ways and using different means, an attempt is made to explore what food might mean for the individual, particularly those whose experience often goes unrecorded - the unclassified or unclassifiable. The MMs Bar was preceded by written texts made during one particular train journey when I would record and mark the event and explore the twin themes of identity and eating, by noting what those who sat near me ate. I didn’t go looking for anyone; the requirements were only that they had to be close by and eating. I then speculated about what this activity told me about who I thought the individuals were or might be. There is a fictionalising going on as I was guessing and interpreting on the basis of my observation which isn’t free of subjectivity. I may also have used the occasion to be critical of the foods eaten which may tap into my perception of how cynical some manufactured foods are and how through certain exaggerated tastes - high salt, sugar, etc. large sections of the population have been lured into eating foods which seem to me to be virtual rather than actual, doing little to nourish, a lot to excite and increase desire, but which aren’t designed with the eater’s best interests at heart.
The MMs Bar (the name of the carriage where passengers were invited to make their purchases) recordings seemed to represent a microcosm of society in which some of the foods we eat were broadcast in all their fascinating glory. Very often, there were stuttering, pauses, uncertainty, mishaps in the broadcasts. It was never possible to know when the broadcast would begin and this added to the random nature of the recordings themselves. There’s a certain snatched quality about them which I feel gives the piece more authenticity.which is added to by the raw quality and unedited nature of the recordings. So, during a period when I was making sometimes twice weekly journeys from London to Leicester, I recorded these buffet car announcements, over the course of a year 2006-7. Although the list of refreshments available were roughly the same on each journey, individual variations would occur and it was these that I listened for. The variant seemed to be a way in which a person expressed their difference in the same way that the tone or volume of their voice did. Unseen, some workers sounded as though they were auditioning for another role in life. Some were a little retiring, others more forthright. The food became secondary. I think of the MMs Bar as expressing a part of who we Englanders are and I hope it represents something of the spirit of the early Mass Observers under the guidance of anthropologist Tom Harrisson, who switched his attention from other continents and peoples to document and study our native habits. The recordings were initially played by William English on his programme, ‘Wavelength’ on Resonance 104.4 FM. It was during a repeat of the programme that Jonny Trunk of Trunk Records heard these and felt he’d like to make a limited edition vinyl of the recordings and so he did.
www.sandracross.org

JULIAN DOYLE / FILTER FEEDER - Alpage
Filter Feeder is Julian Doyle's music & sound project started in 2005 with the release of a CD album 'Feeding Frenzy' and has continued with several further CD and Vinyl releases. Along with numerous live performances these recordings have explored electronic sound, rhythmic improvisation and sound collage using both found sounds & field recordings often with a political or documentary slant. Alpage is anew work developed for this event and consists initially of field recordings made in the Haute Savoie & Jura regions of France. These recordings are progressively layered and manipulated in real time then used as both catalyst and component for a percussion & electronic sound improvisation. Julian Doyle, aka Filter Feeder, takes sound sources as diverse as raw waveforms, washing machines or the human voice and filters and layers them “until I have something that comes alive”. On Pleasure Cycle, the sounds are thin, reedy and microtonal, but the pendulum-like rhythmic loops Doyle sets up slowly became naggingly eerie. The track’s signature two-note pulse suggests some kind of siren being experienced through a hallucinogenic altered haze. Doyle has an intuitive and expressive touch with his microtonal explorations, however, always returning elliptically to warm overtones and lending an almost amniotic warmth to this fine track. Derek Walmsley in The Wire magazine

WILLIAM ENGLISH
'I first met Captain Maurice Frank Henry Urquhart Necom Seddon (Royal Signals, retired) in 1979 when I was a motorcycle messenger. He was standing at the side of the road in Covent Garden, wearing a tabard advertising Heated Gloves, next to an oil soaked BSA which sprouted wires, heating up his lunch by the same method as his clothing. We were friends for the following decades until his death in 2014. When he left his home, Datchet Cottage, after fifty years, he left behind vast amounts of material including hundreds of cassette recordings of his phone calls. After he was taken into a care home the local council set about emptying his house and garden and the vast majority of the cassettes were strewn around on the floor gathering dust and destined for a skip. As executor of his will I was able to gather up as many of the audiocassettes as I could store which resulted in numerous broadcasts on Resonance104.4fm, London’s first radio arts station, and consequently the “Seddon Tapes” as they became known formed a 24 hour marathon which has been broadcast every Christmas for the last 3 years.
Tape 44 of the Seddon tapes, Captain Maurice Seddon speaks at lenght with what may be a hoaxer or an imbecile or an imbecilic hoaxer. Maurice placed an advert in a newspaper asking for a chest freezer to join the vast amount of chest freezers already in his garden. The freezers contain vintage food i.e. bags of food remnants frozen solid, way beyond their shell by date.
A caller responds, apparently based in Chester.
Most people would hang up after 5 minutes but Maurice continues for 30.'
www.williamenglish.com

And Finally: A Blooming Awful End

Polly Gould  Penguin Pool
Design, Darwin and the Archive

Thursday 19 March 2015  7pm

Performative lecture by Polly Gould followed by discussion with Steven Crossan, Founder of Google Cultural Institute, Dr. Peg Rawes, Senior Lecturer at the Bartlett School of Architecture, and Emily Hayes, PhD candidate at the Royal Geographical Society and the University of Exeter.

Gould’s performative lecture is modeled on the Edwardian magic lantern show and the tableau vivant.
They were the popular forms of their time, presented with narration and music, and equally likely to take place in a domestic drawing room or in a public hall. Although now outmoded, magic lantern shows and tableaux vivants can be seen as antecedents to film. For Penguin Pool Gould has recombined a set of old lantern slides into a narrative. It begins with a slide of the penguins in the iconic 1934 design by Lubetkin (1901-1990) for the penguin pond at London Zoo. A 1936 film on Lubetkin’s innovative zoo design claimed that ‘for the first time’ the animals would no longer be ‘housed in artificial reproductions of their natural surroundings.’[1] Like characters in a tableau vivant the animals assume the nonspeaking parts. Polly Gould also considers a lecture titled ‘Some Remarks on Penguins,’ prepared in 1902 by the explorer Edward Wilson (1872-1912) during the Discovery expedition to Antarctica. Wilson, believing penguins to be ‘some of the most primitive behind-hand birds in existence' [2] looked to them to unlock insights into evolution.
Penguin Pool plays on the pun of ‘pool’ as an entertaining architectural design for zoological display and gene pool, which fits the more recent conception of the zoo as a place for conservation of endangered species. Evolutionary ecology is currently being used to predict threats posed to biodiversity from various potential extinctions. In a similar mode, the archive is also considered as a type of gene pool, as a collection of available data and information that can be drawn upon for design innovation and for making predictions of future scenarios.
 

[1] Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, 'The New Architecture of the London Zoo', 1936
[2] Edward Wilson, 'Some remarks on Penguins' in The South Polar Times, Vol 1, April to August 1902, (part IV July 1902, London: Smith, Elder, & Co. 15 Waterloo Place. S.W. 1907. P. 3-9.  

Post-performance discussion Design, Darwin and the Archive:

Steve Crossan works on Public Health at Google, and previously was the founder of Google’s Cultural Institute, a non-profit engineering group that builds free tools allowing partner museums and archives to bring the world’s culture online. Prior to this he has helped build part of Google Maps, Search and Gmail.

Emily Hayes is in the fourth year of her AHRC-funded Collaborative Doctoral Award PhD at the Royal Geographical Society and the University of Exeter. The working title of her thesis is Geographical projections: lantern slides, science and popular geography at the Royal Geographical Society, c.1886 - 1930. She holds a BA in archaeology and anthropology from the University of Cambridge and an MSc in environmental sciences and archaeology from the Sorbonne-Paris X. Prior to undertaking her PhD she catalogued a range of works on paper at several London auction houses and art galleries, notably at Christie's as a specialist in modern and contemporary prints and multiples.

Peg Rawes is Programme Leader for the Master’s in Architectural History at the Bartlett School of Architecture. Her teaching and research focus on how built and social architectural cultures are informed by philosophical ideas of aesthetics, ecology, materials, subjectivity and technology. She is Co-Investigator to the AHRC research project, Equalities in Wellbeing in which she is exploring how 17th century ideas of ratio, geometry and wellbeing engage with the current UK housing crisis issues. This work develops from her recent work into ‘architectures of care’ in Architectural Relational Ecologies (2013), and Poetic Biopolitics (forthcoming 2015). These collaborations with colleagues from philosophy, medicine, law, political science, anthropology and the arts propose political and material forms of architectural sustainability.

Polly Gould is in the last year of her AHRC-funded Doctoral Award PhD at the Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London. Her thesis title is No More Elsewhere: Antarctica through the Archive of the Edward Wilson Watercolours. Edward Wilson (1872-1912) was one of the explorers who died with Captain Scott during his attempt to be first to reach the South Pole. Gould shows with Danielle Arnaud, and has a collaborative and curatorial practice with Anne Eggebert, most recently curating the touring show TOPOPHOBIA.

Dr. Rebecca Kilner unfortunately had to cancel her participation in the panel discussion and sent her apologies.

Booking is essential, please rsvp to danielle@daniellearnaud.com.

 

Read Preamble and see documentation on vimeo

 

 

Curator's Tour Unwheeled
Friday 30 January 2015  7pm
Part of SLAM Last Fridays


Maia Naveriani  Clown  2012  coloured pencil on paper

Curator David Lillington will discuss the works included in our current exhibition Unwheeled.

 

 

Oona Grimes in discussion with Film and TV Director Margy Kinmonth
Friday 28 November 2014  7pm
Part of SLAM Last Fridays


Oona Grimes  toes n toasts (detail)  2014  ceramic
photograph by Peter White

Oona Grimes will discuss her work with Margy Kinmonth, Film and Television Director.

 

 

The Disembodied Voice
Wednesday 29 October 2014  7-9 pm


HAL 9000 from Stanley Kubrick's '2001: A Space Odyssey'

The newly formed research group ‘The Disembodied Voice’ will host its first public event to introduce a series of references in the form of film clips, ideas, texts etc. Each member of the group will present material relating to their own practice and interests concerning ideas of the disembodied voice and its place in contemporary culture.

The group is formed of Maia Conran, Patrick Coyle, Karen Di Franco, The Hut Project, and Karin Kihlberg & Reuben Henry who are also coordinating the programme over the coming months.

For the event at Danielle Arnaud visitors are invited to take part in discussing the presented material as well as celebrating the inaugural event of this research project.

Through critical engagement, discursive processes and production this collaborative research project sets out to investigate the relationship between the disembodied voice and contemporary visual culture. Working together the group will explore an array of questions and ideas relating to their individual practices and concepts surrounding the disembodied voice. The groups participants work across different fields from film making, performance, writing, curating and archiving.

Working through the groups’ individual disciplines the research will explore expanded ideas and complexities of the disembodied voice to leave room for unexpected discoveries, connections and expansions of the subject. The group will take part in workshops, site visits and activities held by guest speakers from a variety of fields to expand on their practice.

The research process will open up for further input by hosting open public events throughout the project.

The project is made possible with the support of Vision Forum and Linköping University in Sweden. Vision Forum carries out research, meetings and production in contemporary visual art across borders.

 

 

Louisa Fairclough in discussion with Composer Richard Glover
Friday 26 September 2014  7pm
Part of SLAM Last Fridays


Louisa Fairclough  Compositions for a Low Tide  2014  Whitstable Biennale
performed by Rochester Cathedral Chorister
photograph by Bernard G. Mills

Louisa Fairclough will be in discussion with composer Richard Glover who had collaborated with her on Compositions for a Low Tide, Absolute Pitch and I wish I could be a stone.

Richard Glover makes experimental music investigating perception and temporality within music of sustained tone textures and process music. He recently released a portrait CD on the experimental music label ‘Another Timbre’, and co-authored the book Overcoming Form: reflections on immersive listening. He gained his PhD from Huddersfield and has worked with leading international performers including the Bozzini Quartet, EXAUDI vocal ensemble, musikFabrik, Birmingham Contemporary Music Group, Dedalus Ensemble and the BBC Concert Orchestra.

 

 

Paul Ryan  Agathe
Workings towards a new novel by Robert Musil, as an Artist’s Book by Paul Ryan

Monday 8 to Thursday 11 September 2014
daily from 12noon to 7pm


Paul Ryan  'Playing with animals from circus posters'  2014
cut out and mounted on board

By invitation only

The purpose of this initial display is to bring together publishers and others, interested in, studying, researching, or otherwise involved with, the life & works of Robert Musil; and to discuss with them the possibilities for the project as it goes forward to completion.

Paul Ryan will be available, during the opening times, to discuss the results of his ‘research and development’ phase for a new novel Agathe extracted from Musil’s unfinished novel The Man Without Qualities. He will exhibit proposed texts and drawings for the first third of the narrative. These are working materials towards the novel to be completed in three forms: artist’s book, illustrated novel, and text only novel.

Please RSVP to paul@paulryan.co.uk

 

 

Anne Brodie in discussion with Caterina Albano and Catriona Brodie
Sunday 6 July 2014  4pm


Anne Brodie  'Something that goes with me'  2014  video

On the occasion of her exhibition Dead Mother, artist Anne Brodie will be in conversation with her sister G.P. Dr Catriona Brodie and Curator, Writer and Central Saint Martins Research Fellow Dr Caterina Albano.

Since 1984 Catriona Brodie has trained and worked as a GP in South East London. In addition to her general practice she has been a doctor to young people in periods of transition whilst a Forensic Physician to the Metropolitan Police and whilst a Medical Officer at Goldsmiths College. She has an embryonic interest in teaching the recognition of distress and the opportunities for intervention in this population.

Caterina Albano is a senior research fellow and curator at Central Saint Martin’s College, University of the Arts London. Albano curates, lectures and publishes in the fields of art, cultural history and theory, in particular emotion and affect, memory and consciousness; and on the theory of curating. She is the author of Fear and Art in the Contemporary World (Reaktion Books, 2012) and she is currently working on a project on affect, memory and art (Palgrave MacMillan).

 

 

Anne Brodie  Artist Talk 
Friday 27 June 2014  7pm
Part of SLAM Last Fridays


Anne Brodie  The Mark  2014  video

Anne Brodie will present her work Dead Mother.

 

 

Suky Best  Artist Talk 
Friday 30 May 2014  7pm
Part of SLAM Last Fridays


Suky Best  Alwyn Park House  2011  animation with sound

Suky Best will discuss the works currently presented in her solo show Wild Interior.

 

 

Enclosure  Artists Talk 
Friday 28 March 2014  7pm
Part of SLAM Last Fridays


Stephen Walter  Of This Wood Man Shall Know Nothing  2014  graphite on paper  33.5 x 45.3 cm

Dan Hays, Gabriela Schutz and Stephen Walter will discuss the works included in the exhibition Enclosure .

 

 

Uta Kögelsberger  Artist Talk
Friday 31 January 2014  7pm
Part of SLAM Last Fridays


Off road  video still  2012

Uta Kögelsberger will discuss the works shown in her solo show Off Road .

 

 

Polly Gould  No More Elsewhere
Closing Event - Performative Lecture (booking essential)
Sunday 16 June 2013  3pm


Lantern Landscape 2013 installation view
tulip wood, wax, paint, hand-blown moulded glass, magic lantern

Performative Lecture by Polly Gould

For the closing event on Sunday 16 June at 3pm, Polly Gould will present a 30 minute performative lecture amongst the installed artworks of the exhibition. The performance takes as a starting point the photographer Ponting’s 1911 self-portrait operating a magic lantern for the polar party. Polly also refers to Wilson’s hand-written notes for a lecture on sketching held at the Scott Polar Research Institute. In these notes Wilson calls for ‘a copyist’ rather than some expressive artistic fellow. His lecture on sketching for the men in the polar hut was a mirror image of the educational tours of Edwardian drawing rooms that Wilson undertook on return from the Discovery Expedition of 1901-04. The performative lecture takes a sideways glance at some of the people that inhabit this narrative, putting the camp back into camping. The artist uses quotation, projection and sound to present a mirroring with distortions of her encounter with elsewhere through Wilson’s Antarctic archive.This performance will be accompanied by the London-based musician Hibiki Ichikawa.

 

 

Conteuses: An Evening with Kate Bernheimer
curated by Catriona McAra, hosted by Danielle Arnaud
with contributions from Samantha Sweeting and Tessa Farmer
Friday 7 June 2013  6.30pm

In honour of the American fairy tale writer Kate Bernheimer and in response to her renowned collection Mirror, Mirror on the Wall (1998), Conteuses invites you to an evening of collective discussion, collaboration and celebration. As we have learned from such critical Scheherazades as Bernheimer, Marina Warner (1994), Cristina Bacchilega (1999) and Elizabeth Wanning Harries (2001), the late seventeenth century gave rise to a trend of aristocratic female storytellers or conteuses, a tendency which is reflected in late twentieth century art and literature. But what has the early twenty-first century inherited and what constitutes feminist practice today? Is the prefix “woman” writer/artist unnecessary or does it still have a role to play in fairy tale telling, writing and making? How does it overcome cliché? Following in the glass footsteps of Angela Carter, A.S. Byatt, Kiki Smith, Dorothea Tanning and Leonora Carrington, among many others, we encounter a new generation of uncompromisingly subversive and achingly beautiful practice. This research-through-practice forum aims to explore notions of embodied storytelling by contemporary tellers of tales in a variety of media (including literature, sculpture and performance). Conteuses assembles a new generation of female voices in the hope of conjuring innovative connections and fostering intimate dialogues.

Review of the 'Conteuses' event by Joanna Coleman: http://issuu.com/scfff/docs/newsletter_jun-jul


 

TESSA FARMER
Enchanted Garden: Flower Fairies and Dark Tales
Mottisfont Abbey, National Trust
2 July 2011 - 2 October 2011

 

VOLTA6 Basel
David Cotterrell   Nicky Coutts   Karin Kihlberg and Reuben Henry   Heather and Ivan Morison
16 - 20 June 2010


TATTON PARK BIENNIAL 2010
Oona Grimes, Helen Maurer and Sophie Lascelles
have been selected to take part in the 2nd biennial of contemporary art at Tatton Park near Manchester.
Tatton Park Biennial 2010 - 8 May to 26 September 2008
www.tattonparkbiennial.org


DAVID COTTERRELL at RUSI, Whitehall
David took part in a debate chaired by Jon Snow to discuss Britain's historical approach to remembrance.
10 March 2010 7 pm


VOLTA NY Kathleen Herbert
Solo: video, sculpture etchings
4 to 7 March 2010


DAVID COTTERRELL
David Cotterrell has been awarded a Philip Leverhulme Prize.
The Trustees are pleased to announce the results of the 2009 competition for Philip Leverhulme Prizes.
These Prizes are awarded to outstanding young scholars who have made a substantial and recognised contribution to their particular field, are recognised at an international level, and whose future contributions are held to be of correspondingly high promise. Further details can be found at the Leverhulme Trust website.

 

[PAST NEWS]

OPEN MULTIVERSITY
an evening of performances with Jemima and Dolly Brown, Ole Hagen, Alicia Paz, Plastique Fantastique,
Kit Poulson and Alex Baker
Swedenborg Hall 20-21 Bloomsbury Way London WC1A 2TH
Monday 13 July 2009 7 - 10 pm

VOLTA NY Heather & Ivan Morison
I hate her. I hate her. puppet show
5 to 8 March 2009

TATTON PARK BIENNIAL 2008

David Cotterrell, Heather & Ivan Morison and Paulette Phillips
have been selected to take part in the first biennial of contemporary art in a National Trust property,
Tatton Park near Manchester.
Tatton Park Biennial 2008 - 3 May to 28 September 2008
www.tattonparkbiennial.org

 

Judy Price - Screenings at the Imperial War Museum, Lambeth Road, London SE1
June 9 - 29 2008
> click for details

Judy Price - In conversation with Jananne Al-Ani
4pm Sunday June 15 in the gallery
Judy Price will discuss her new video and sound installation with Jananne Al-Ani
The informal conversation will be followed by tea and cakes in the garden (weather permitting).
> booking essential danielle@daniellearnaud.com

 

David Cotterrell  at the Royal Society of Arts
Tuesday 10 June 2008 6pm
RSA, 8 John Adam Street, WC2N 6EZ

Culture in a time of conflict

The panel will include artist David Cotterrell and writer Andrew O’Hagan

The fourth event in this series will explore the environmental footprint of war from an arts perspective. The makers of the film ‘Scarred Lands’ described the environment as the ‘silent casualty’ of war. War carries many environmental implications and resource depletion is increasingly engendering conflict. Michael Klare painted a terrifying picture of ‘the new landscape of global conflict’ in his book Resource Wars. How are artists responding to these challenges and what is their perspective on war?

In November last year David Cotterrell spent three weeks with the Royal Army Medical Corps and Royal Marine Commandos for a residency supported by the Wellcome Trust at Camp Bastion in Helmand Province. 

This military perspective was recently complimented by a second trip to Afghanistan, this time through civilian eyes, on an Arts & Ecology residency in Kabul, Afghanistan with Turquoise Mountain. During his time in Kabul he had the opportunity to engage and work with artists, craft makers and art students both at Kabul University and Turquoise Mountain’s Centre for Traditional Afghan Art and Architecture in Kabul

For his recent collection of essays, The Atlantic Ocean, writer Andrew O’Hagan researched the lives of two infantrymen, one British and one American, who died on the same night in Iraq.  Many of O’Hagan’s novels have voiced issues surrounding conflict and he has also written numerous articles exploring the ethics of war.

Be Near Me, his last novel, won the 2008 Los Angeles Times Book Prize award for fiction.  He joined the prestigious Robert Burns Humanitarian Award judging panel this year and has recently returned from Palestine where he participated in the Palestine Festival of Literature.

Click here to reserve a place

 

 

Paulette Phillips: 29 March to 26 April 2008
History appears twice, the first time as tragedy, the second time as farce. Diaz Contemporary, Toronto

Sophie Lascelles : Jerwood Contemporary Painters
9 April to 18 May 2008 Jerwood Space, London &
22 June to 17 August 2008 Royal West of England Academy Queens Road, Bristol

Heather & Ivan Morison: Zoorama : London Underground Station - Platform for Art

Heather & Ivan Morison: Welsh Pavilion Venice Biennale 10 June to 21 November 2007

Oona Grimes and Sophie Lascelles: Hidden Narratives, Graves Art Gallery, Sheffield, 19 January to 19 April 2008

David Cotterrell:

Eastern Standard: Western Artists in China, 2 February to 31 December 2008, MASS MoCA North Adams,
Massachusettes, USA

Commissioned by the Wellcome Trust to make new work for the forthcoming exhibition War & Medicine
(working title)  Autumn 2008

Commissioned by CABE, Arts and Business and Arts Council England  as the lead artist consultant for the
'CB1' Masterplan in Cambridge in collaboration with Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners and Commissions East.

Eurasia One, Exhibition of 16 Chinese and European artists, curated by Rolf Kluenter, Andrea Neidhoefer
(Shanghai Museum of Contemporary Art). Hosted by Island 6 Art Centre, Shanghai and supported by The German
Cultural Consulate.

 

[ART FAIRS]

the gallery will participate in the following art fairs:

Aqua Art Miami Miami, USA      4 to 7 December 2008

Aqua Art Miami